Audio Soundtrack Competition

Image result for ADAM A8XThe first prize is a special edition of the ADAM A8X studio monitors in white piano lacquer. Only a pair of these ADAM A8X speakers have been made specifically for this contest worldwide! In addition, other prizes will be winners, including the new ADAM SP-5 headphones (for 2nd place) and a pair of ADAM T5V speakers (for 3rd place).

  • Upload the finished soundtack to your Soundcloud or YouTube account (if you do not already have one: the account can be created for free and easy)
  • The title of the uploaded soundtrack must include the hashtags #adamaudio and #soundtrack
  • Fill out the form you can find here:  www.adam-audio.com/en/soundtrack-competition-2018/

Audio Soundtrack Competition

Image result for ADAM A8XThe first prize is a special edition of the ADAM A8X studio monitors in white piano lacquer. Only a pair of these ADAM A8X speakers have been made specifically for this contest worldwide! In addition, other prizes will be winners, including the new ADAM SP-5 headphones (for 2nd place) and a pair of ADAM T5V speakers (for 3rd place).

  • Upload the finished soundtack to your Soundcloud or YouTube account (if you do not already have one: the account can be created for free and easy)
  • The title of the uploaded soundtrack must include the hashtags #adamaudio and #soundtrack
  • Fill out the form you can find here:  www.adam-audio.com/en/soundtrack-competition-2018/

Recording with the nerves Interview with Ralv Milberg

Ralv MilbergRalv Milberg is the man of trust when it comes to recording for The Nerves. Together with the three-headed band, it went to Tuscany last year to record the third studio album. Why they took the long journey instead of doing the job in their own studio, and how they went about it, we could learn from Ralv in direct conversation.

Already for the last album Out, the band went for a few days in the solitude of the Swabian forests, to record there in peace (if you can say that in this genre) record. For the current album Fake, it went back to the “holiday”, this time in the summer Tuscany. Vacation? Not quite: Your van was up to the roof fully loaded with music and studio equipment. As soon as arrived, the rented Dolce Vita was inspected, and according to acoustic characteristics, recording room, direction and some other rooms were assigned to their respective destination.

Ralv, so you have recorded the third album of nerves?

Yes, it’s the third studio album, and also the third one they recorded with me. Before, there was already a self-produced album, a few individual recordings and an EP with which I had nothing to do. By the way, for all three albums I have covered all disciplines of sound engineering: from recording, editing, mixdown, post-pro to mastering. If that was always good, others have to decide, but it’s also a bit special. The nerves and I understand each other very well in terms of music, and we have become good friends over the years.

Mixdown - Ralv Milberg with elixir of life

Do you frequently do all the jobs in person or is this an exception?

I would sometimes wish that I would not always have to do everything. Now, by the nerves, it is also a question of aesthetics, since there are so many micro-decisions that mean for such a madman as Max Rieger (singer / guitarist of the nerves, ed.) Worlds.

We talked for days and weeks in many intensive discussions about the sound aesthetics and the question of what the band wants to do. In some cases, extra equipment is purchased for the production, which is not really included in the budget – that’s what you do for art alone.

For other customers, the ratio of mastering is often still in question. Good mastering costs a lot, and that’s a good thing, but for most people, it’s usually not in the ratio of the total album production. That can easily cost a quarter of the total production – at least for large productions that’s my impression. So many bands say, “Oh, then you do the mastering too.”

Did you have a producer on the side for this production?

In any case, a good conversation partner in this regard is Max Rieger, who has already done productions on his own. In the past, he also spent every spare minute with me in the studio – for a while he used to spend his nights on the sofa. He went to school pretty well, knows his way around, and with him I can speak on an extreme level, about stories that hardly interest other people.

Max is technically the most experienced, but the other two feel pretty strong and that’s very important.

Let’s take a look at the recordings: From when to when were the recordings, and why Tuscany?

That was in the second half of September 2017. We had already done that with the previous album Out. That did not mean out in vain, because we were really very far out in the Swabian forests, there we went in search of complete loneliness. At that time, I realized that the band can really work the most concentrated if it is really left alone. Only this time it was important to me that a little bit of Dolce Vita comes in the record. The music of the nerves is yes – well, let’s say – rather melancholic with a slightly dark touch. That’s why we wanted to make something a little bit happier and get away from the image of the “most ill-tempered band of the nation”. And that works best in the South, with Vespa sounds, good wine and good olive oil.

We then searched for and found an estate in Italy. I think, had we not had this beautiful weather and this beautiful environment, then we would have hit our heads this time – no day went under 16, 17 hours. Since everyone had to go beyond its limits, that was already bad in the making, and it was simply called for maximum performance.

And the positive flair is refected on the record?

I would personally say that. Of course, it depends on how strong you now z. Weighted texts, for example. But basically, I think that the record is a bit lighter and a bit more fluffy, as far as the sound is concerned. Of course, not everywhere and at any point – she has become a little more varied. Also, the boys started to sing properly, before there was mainly quite emotional screaming and chanting.

Also, we have worked a lot with overdubs now, especially when singing, even if it is usually mixed only quietly. The subject of overdubing was not necessarily frowned upon before, but then it always went in a psychedelic direction, and usually it was not musical overdubs, but rather noises. A kettle for. B. we had recorded once and mixed in an increase.

Does that mean that you also recorded polyphonic singing?

Even that. I even had the honor to sing along, I’ve been a musician and singer all my life. But I’m always far behind in the mix. We have, I say, discovered an official pop music approach to this record, and for that other vibes had to prevail. I think that the record has become much more positive – in a way. (Laughs)

As you can see, you have had a lot of technology on site. Did you bring all this from Germany or did you borrow something locally?

No, we brought it all from Germany, that was a huge effort. This time around, there was not even a big budget, although the band did a good job of sneaking it up before and z. B. has applied for funding through the Initiative Musik and these have also been approved. Then you had a little more budget, but of course not in your own pocket, but in the rent of the estate, the trip and of course the technology went. But in principle we have built a studio out of nowhere.

That was also connected with an intensive planning. I had to think about how this can be done. 30 channels should be recorded at the same time, three separate stereo headphone mixes of instruments in three different rooms plus the hall where we recorded a space trace.

Incidentally, the estate was organized by bassist Julian, who spent half his childhood in the area and therefore knew his way around, where it is beautiful and who makes such a noise. It was once again very loud, you have heard that in the whole area. The volume is certainly also aesthetics and soundprägend. That’s even louder, but in principle it is still so that z. For example, guitar amplifiers are more like their own sound systems that need a certain level of bass before they start to sing. Of course that was a blatant number, as there were only “natural” absorbers in the house, ie curtains, mattresses, sofas, etc., but also a relatively large number of smooth surfaces and therefore quite a lot of reflections.

And you have got as a handle?

It is first the question of whether you must get the fundamentally and completely under control. The biggest problem is mostly crosstalk, modulation or standing waves. The recording room for the drums z. B. had first of all an incredibly beautiful acoustics with a very high, sloping ceiling with beams. On the side was still a shelf that was almost like a diffuser, so the sound was already excellent.

It was then no microphone further than a maximum of two and a half meters, except a dynamic bullet microphone on the drums, the Sony F-115, which I always like when I want to remove mono spaces from above, without it sounds tinny. We did not have other classic room columns. We did not even have conventional overheads, but a center-side microphone from the front.

What did the rest of your recording session look like?

The dresser was in the kitchen, and Max and Julian Knoth (bass / vocals) were in the same room. The guitar amps were in a neighboring room, the bass amps even on another floor. This was necessary to get as clean as possible, which also worked amazingly well.

By the way, in the last albums we had exactly the opposite concept. That’s when we thought about how to record this in order to get the best possible live sound. At that time, we had recorded everything in a room with room microphones and subtly mixed close-mics to make the sound a bit more filling. Now it was much more of a studio album with overdubs – including guitars, bass and drums – and critics have paradoxically written that the band has now managed to capture the live sound for the first time. (Laughs)

All in all, that was an insane effort.

How did you establish the communication between the director and the recording room? You did not have a window.

Exactly, there was not a window. We simply had to lay correspondingly many kilometers of cable. Then of course we set up talkback and listenback microphones, at least for Max, Julian and myself – Kevin had enough on the drums – and that worked. That you did not see each other was a bit strange, but you got used to it quite quickly. Maybe it was a bit of an advantage, as I focused solely on the music and was not visually distracted from their physical performance. So maybe I listened more closely.

Before the guitaramps you had an MD21 and a Microtech Gefell MT 71 S, the latter of which is quite unconventionally positioned with the side to the amp. What’s it all about?

This is also a middle-side miking – a bit crazier, but why not? Max and I listened to many side signals from modern productions during the preview for the production and realized that there is not a lot going on, except that they have a lot of saturation effects and nice reverb flags that are pretty much modulated. And we wanted to have these signals as well. After that, they were taken neatly through the mill – they did not have to be authentic, but were supposed to be slightly broader.

Of course, everything is mixed in mono, because you can not stretch the instruments so far apart, otherwise this musical interlocking does not arise. That is why the base width is never very wide, but this should at least be pretended.

What did the recording of the bass look like?

For bass, that was a matter of through-line. The bass system was indeed on another floor with a loose 30 meters of cable in between. That is, one has to go from unbalanced to symmetrical, then back again. We had an active DI box, which can loop through the signal 1: 1, but also has a balanced output, through which one can tap a kind of prefiltered DI signal – that was the MicroBass II from EBS. This has especially an extremely clean shaping in the low-frequency range, so that you can actually put a low-cut on all microphones, and you only take the low end of the EBS MicroBass. So you do not run the risk that the bottom is somehow too spongy. From this DI box, it went on symmetrically until shortly before the amps to a passive Emo Systems with Sowter transformer,

There was a main bass amp, an Ampeg SVT 3 with 8x10s box, with a MD421-II before – very conservative – and a Neumann TLM193, which also allows a very nice bass recording. This has a slightly wider kidney, and the bass I find it not so wrong when it tends towards the ball.

In front of the second Bassamp, an old Peavey Transistortop section with an ancient JBL bassbox, stood an old MD421 and an Electro Voice RE20, which, as a vintage version, also worked very well to be included as an option, such as the midrange to fill something up. And finally, a Line6 modeling amp came with a Telefunken M80 to get some more bite. This has z. B. works well for fuzz tirades. All of this was then mixed together to a bass sound, which is actually very different for each piece.

Tuscany - Bass Room

 

Did you use all tracks in the end?

Definitel! For nerves, I basically do that so that there is a spatially imaging main microfonation, and then the other is proportionately pushed – I do that to have a red thread across the plates. This time, however, the clos-mics were predoinantly more dominant than the room-mics. Luckily, there are tools like Auto-align from Soundradix that make it possible to send in microphones with different runtimes at the touch of a button.

On the drums, the main microphone was the mid-side mic, two Neumann U89s, which were very close to the bass drum, and with the good acoustics of the room, the whole thing sounds very powerful and overall very balanced, so that other close-mics only discreetly had to be mixed. Even art-hall we barely needed the mixdown, only one, two pieces, if it should go a little more direction stadiums rock. That was the M5000 from TC Electronic. Apart from that, we recorded toms and snare while reamping over an amp in an extremely reverberant room with stereo microphones. All other hall effects on the drums were just natural spaces. What was your work on the mixdown?The mixdown was done exclusively on the computer – that was a concession to a more modern sound. From Mixdown on the PC, I’m actually not a big fan, because I like to use analog devices, as you may also recognize the whole outboard, and synonymous for mixing, I like to use a real desk.After the mixdown session, I then at least imagined that this is the 0.3% that the mix could have been better. I was just about to buy a totalizer, because the selectivity in Cubase and many other components that always irritate me to analog work, were not met for my taste here. I had to fix that during mastering – luckily I mastered it myself, so I knew exactly where I wanted to go again. But a good totalizer for the record would have tasted good ashes again. But the money was too short in the end.

 

Tuscany - Recording Setup 2
On the topic of Outboard: How do you use compressors?

So when tracking was already relatively much worked with compression, although I never do so extreme. Regarding EQs or filters, I’ll try another microphone or placement before using an EQ or filter.

For vocal recordings I am a big friend of the NTP 179-170 compressor. The works incredibly soft and inaudible, but already allows a strong gain reduction, without noticing that there was compressed. I drove it in places with a gain reduction of 7, 8, 9 dB. That was necessary, because here is sometimes extremely screaming, partly whispered – sometimes out of the room, sometimes from extremely close to the mic. As a vocal microphone, I used the Neumann TLM49, which has a very modern sound.

What is the essential difference to the home studio? Were there pros and cons too?

So with the technical effort that we have done, you can not really say that. We had almost built a complete recording studio, it was actually there. There was such a thing in the control room: I had good headphones with me and two old Electro Voice Sentry speakers and a small & bumblebee power amp, but the listening environment was still enough to listen to the take, but it was not acoustically very good control room. That’s what I missed most. It was then always an assessment, as it sounds with me in the studio on really decent speakers. In the end, luckily, everything sounded good.

Recording with the nerves Interview with Ralv Milberg

Ralv MilbergRalv Milberg is the man of trust when it comes to recording for The Nerves. Together with the three-headed band, it went to Tuscany last year to record the third studio album. Why they took the long journey instead of doing the job in their own studio, and how they went about it, we could learn from Ralv in direct conversation.

Already for the last album Out, the band went for a few days in the solitude of the Swabian forests, to record there in peace (if you can say that in this genre) record. For the current album Fake, it went back to the “holiday”, this time in the summer Tuscany. Vacation? Not quite: Your van was up to the roof fully loaded with music and studio equipment. As soon as arrived, the rented Dolce Vita was inspected, and according to acoustic characteristics, recording room, direction and some other rooms were assigned to their respective destination.

Ralv, so you have recorded the third album of nerves?

Yes, it’s the third studio album, and also the third one they recorded with me. Before, there was already a self-produced album, a few individual recordings and an EP with which I had nothing to do. By the way, for all three albums I have covered all disciplines of sound engineering: from recording, editing, mixdown, post-pro to mastering. If that was always good, others have to decide, but it’s also a bit special. The nerves and I understand each other very well in terms of music, and we have become good friends over the years.

Mixdown - Ralv Milberg with elixir of life

Do you frequently do all the jobs in person or is this an exception?

I would sometimes wish that I would not always have to do everything. Now, by the nerves, it is also a question of aesthetics, since there are so many micro-decisions that mean for such a madman as Max Rieger (singer / guitarist of the nerves, ed.) Worlds.

We talked for days and weeks in many intensive discussions about the sound aesthetics and the question of what the band wants to do. In some cases, extra equipment is purchased for the production, which is not really included in the budget – that’s what you do for art alone.

For other customers, the ratio of mastering is often still in question. Good mastering costs a lot, and that’s a good thing, but for most people, it’s usually not in the ratio of the total album production. That can easily cost a quarter of the total production – at least for large productions that’s my impression. So many bands say, “Oh, then you do the mastering too.”

Did you have a producer on the side for this production?

In any case, a good conversation partner in this regard is Max Rieger, who has already done productions on his own. In the past, he also spent every spare minute with me in the studio – for a while he used to spend his nights on the sofa. He went to school pretty well, knows his way around, and with him I can speak on an extreme level, about stories that hardly interest other people.

Max is technically the most experienced, but the other two feel pretty strong and that’s very important.

Let’s take a look at the recordings: From when to when were the recordings, and why Tuscany?

That was in the second half of September 2017. We had already done that with the previous album Out. That did not mean out in vain, because we were really very far out in the Swabian forests, there we went in search of complete loneliness. At that time, I realized that the band can really work the most concentrated if it is really left alone. Only this time it was important to me that a little bit of Dolce Vita comes in the record. The music of the nerves is yes – well, let’s say – rather melancholic with a slightly dark touch. That’s why we wanted to make something a little bit happier and get away from the image of the “most ill-tempered band of the nation”. And that works best in the South, with Vespa sounds, good wine and good olive oil.

We then searched for and found an estate in Italy. I think, had we not had this beautiful weather and this beautiful environment, then we would have hit our heads this time – no day went under 16, 17 hours. Since everyone had to go beyond its limits, that was already bad in the making, and it was simply called for maximum performance.

And the positive flair is refected on the record?

I would personally say that. Of course, it depends on how strong you now z. Weighted texts, for example. But basically, I think that the record is a bit lighter and a bit more fluffy, as far as the sound is concerned. Of course, not everywhere and at any point – she has become a little more varied. Also, the boys started to sing properly, before there was mainly quite emotional screaming and chanting.

Also, we have worked a lot with overdubs now, especially when singing, even if it is usually mixed only quietly. The subject of overdubing was not necessarily frowned upon before, but then it always went in a psychedelic direction, and usually it was not musical overdubs, but rather noises. A kettle for. B. we had recorded once and mixed in an increase.

Does that mean that you also recorded polyphonic singing?

Even that. I even had the honor to sing along, I’ve been a musician and singer all my life. But I’m always far behind in the mix. We have, I say, discovered an official pop music approach to this record, and for that other vibes had to prevail. I think that the record has become much more positive – in a way. (Laughs)

As you can see, you have had a lot of technology on site. Did you bring all this from Germany or did you borrow something locally?

No, we brought it all from Germany, that was a huge effort. This time around, there was not even a big budget, although the band did a good job of sneaking it up before and z. B. has applied for funding through the Initiative Musik and these have also been approved. Then you had a little more budget, but of course not in your own pocket, but in the rent of the estate, the trip and of course the technology went. But in principle we have built a studio out of nowhere.

That was also connected with an intensive planning. I had to think about how this can be done. 30 channels should be recorded at the same time, three separate stereo headphone mixes of instruments in three different rooms plus the hall where we recorded a space trace.

Incidentally, the estate was organized by bassist Julian, who spent half his childhood in the area and therefore knew his way around, where it is beautiful and who makes such a noise. It was once again very loud, you have heard that in the whole area. The volume is certainly also aesthetics and soundprägend. That’s even louder, but in principle it is still so that z. For example, guitar amplifiers are more like their own sound systems that need a certain level of bass before they start to sing. Of course that was a blatant number, as there were only “natural” absorbers in the house, ie curtains, mattresses, sofas, etc., but also a relatively large number of smooth surfaces and therefore quite a lot of reflections.

And you have got as a handle?

It is first the question of whether you must get the fundamentally and completely under control. The biggest problem is mostly crosstalk, modulation or standing waves. The recording room for the drums z. B. had first of all an incredibly beautiful acoustics with a very high, sloping ceiling with beams. On the side was still a shelf that was almost like a diffuser, so the sound was already excellent.

It was then no microphone further than a maximum of two and a half meters, except a dynamic bullet microphone on the drums, the Sony F-115, which I always like when I want to remove mono spaces from above, without it sounds tinny. We did not have other classic room columns. We did not even have conventional overheads, but a center-side microphone from the front.

What did the rest of your recording session look like?

The dresser was in the kitchen, and Max and Julian Knoth (bass / vocals) were in the same room. The guitar amps were in a neighboring room, the bass amps even on another floor. This was necessary to get as clean as possible, which also worked amazingly well.

By the way, in the last albums we had exactly the opposite concept. That’s when we thought about how to record this in order to get the best possible live sound. At that time, we had recorded everything in a room with room microphones and subtly mixed close-mics to make the sound a bit more filling. Now it was much more of a studio album with overdubs – including guitars, bass and drums – and critics have paradoxically written that the band has now managed to capture the live sound for the first time. (Laughs)

All in all, that was an insane effort.

How did you establish the communication between the director and the recording room? You did not have a window.

Exactly, there was not a window. We simply had to lay correspondingly many kilometers of cable. Then of course we set up talkback and listenback microphones, at least for Max, Julian and myself – Kevin had enough on the drums – and that worked. That you did not see each other was a bit strange, but you got used to it quite quickly. Maybe it was a bit of an advantage, as I focused solely on the music and was not visually distracted from their physical performance. So maybe I listened more closely.

Before the guitaramps you had an MD21 and a Microtech Gefell MT 71 S, the latter of which is quite unconventionally positioned with the side to the amp. What’s it all about?

This is also a middle-side miking – a bit crazier, but why not? Max and I listened to many side signals from modern productions during the preview for the production and realized that there is not a lot going on, except that they have a lot of saturation effects and nice reverb flags that are pretty much modulated. And we wanted to have these signals as well. After that, they were taken neatly through the mill – they did not have to be authentic, but were supposed to be slightly broader.

Of course, everything is mixed in mono, because you can not stretch the instruments so far apart, otherwise this musical interlocking does not arise. That is why the base width is never very wide, but this should at least be pretended.

What did the recording of the bass look like?

For bass, that was a matter of through-line. The bass system was indeed on another floor with a loose 30 meters of cable in between. That is, one has to go from unbalanced to symmetrical, then back again. We had an active DI box, which can loop through the signal 1: 1, but also has a balanced output, through which one can tap a kind of prefiltered DI signal – that was the MicroBass II from EBS. This has especially an extremely clean shaping in the low-frequency range, so that you can actually put a low-cut on all microphones, and you only take the low end of the EBS MicroBass. So you do not run the risk that the bottom is somehow too spongy. From this DI box, it went on symmetrically until shortly before the amps to a passive Emo Systems with Sowter transformer,

There was a main bass amp, an Ampeg SVT 3 with 8x10s box, with a MD421-II before – very conservative – and a Neumann TLM193, which also allows a very nice bass recording. This has a slightly wider kidney, and the bass I find it not so wrong when it tends towards the ball.

In front of the second Bassamp, an old Peavey Transistortop section with an ancient JBL bassbox, stood an old MD421 and an Electro Voice RE20, which, as a vintage version, also worked very well to be included as an option, such as the midrange to fill something up. And finally, a Line6 modeling amp came with a Telefunken M80 to get some more bite. This has z. B. works well for fuzz tirades. All of this was then mixed together to a bass sound, which is actually very different for each piece.

Tuscany - Bass Room

 

Did you use all tracks in the end?

Definitel! For nerves, I basically do that so that there is a spatially imaging main microfonation, and then the other is proportionately pushed – I do that to have a red thread across the plates. This time, however, the clos-mics were predoinantly more dominant than the room-mics. Luckily, there are tools like Auto-align from Soundradix that make it possible to send in microphones with different runtimes at the touch of a button.

On the drums, the main microphone was the mid-side mic, two Neumann U89s, which were very close to the bass drum, and with the good acoustics of the room, the whole thing sounds very powerful and overall very balanced, so that other close-mics only discreetly had to be mixed. Even art-hall we barely needed the mixdown, only one, two pieces, if it should go a little more direction stadiums rock. That was the M5000 from TC Electronic. Apart from that, we recorded toms and snare while reamping over an amp in an extremely reverberant room with stereo microphones. All other hall effects on the drums were just natural spaces. What was your work on the mixdown?The mixdown was done exclusively on the computer – that was a concession to a more modern sound. From Mixdown on the PC, I’m actually not a big fan, because I like to use analog devices, as you may also recognize the whole outboard, and synonymous for mixing, I like to use a real desk.After the mixdown session, I then at least imagined that this is the 0.3% that the mix could have been better. I was just about to buy a totalizer, because the selectivity in Cubase and many other components that always irritate me to analog work, were not met for my taste here. I had to fix that during mastering – luckily I mastered it myself, so I knew exactly where I wanted to go again. But a good totalizer for the record would have tasted good ashes again. But the money was too short in the end.

 

Tuscany - Recording Setup 2
On the topic of Outboard: How do you use compressors?

So when tracking was already relatively much worked with compression, although I never do so extreme. Regarding EQs or filters, I’ll try another microphone or placement before using an EQ or filter.

For vocal recordings I am a big friend of the NTP 179-170 compressor. The works incredibly soft and inaudible, but already allows a strong gain reduction, without noticing that there was compressed. I drove it in places with a gain reduction of 7, 8, 9 dB. That was necessary, because here is sometimes extremely screaming, partly whispered – sometimes out of the room, sometimes from extremely close to the mic. As a vocal microphone, I used the Neumann TLM49, which has a very modern sound.

What is the essential difference to the home studio? Were there pros and cons too?

So with the technical effort that we have done, you can not really say that. We had almost built a complete recording studio, it was actually there. There was such a thing in the control room: I had good headphones with me and two old Electro Voice Sentry speakers and a small & bumblebee power amp, but the listening environment was still enough to listen to the take, but it was not acoustically very good control room. That’s what I missed most. It was then always an assessment, as it sounds with me in the studio on really decent speakers. In the end, luckily, everything sounded good.

Rotary-Mixer in Test

The concept is simple: Instead of using faders, one works exclusively with rotary knobs, so-called Rotaries. This mixing interface has been particularly well established in former disco and house clubs, as Rotary and even smoother transitions are possible. One of the pioneers was Rudy Bozak, who designed his own DJ mixer for vvarious discoteques in New York City at the beginning of the 70s. The Bozak CMA-10-2DL was the first commercially produced rotary mixer and has found many imitators to this day. Omnitronic has taken advantage of this tried-and-tested concept to develop another TRM series. The result was a classic 4-channelmixer. Crossfader? No indication, beacause that would not be true to style! This control element was only very popular from the 80s, thanks to DJ Kool Herc and Grandmaster Flash.

Pros and cons

+++ good workmanship

+++ XLR output for Master and Booth

+++ good sound quality

– no PFL metering of the inputs

– no gain controls on the user interface

Rotary-Mixer in Test

The concept is simple: Instead of using faders, one works exclusively with rotary knobs, so-called Rotaries. This mixing interface has been particularly well established in former disco and house clubs, as Rotary and even smoother transitions are possible. One of the pioneers was Rudy Bozak, who designed his own DJ mixer for vvarious discoteques in New York City at the beginning of the 70s. The Bozak CMA-10-2DL was the first commercially produced rotary mixer and has found many imitators to this day. Omnitronic has taken advantage of this tried-and-tested concept to develop another TRM series. The result was a classic 4-channelmixer. Crossfader? No indication, beacause that would not be true to style! This control element was only very popular from the 80s, thanks to DJ Kool Herc and Grandmaster Flash.

Pros and cons

+++ good workmanship

+++ XLR output for Master and Booth

+++ good sound quality

– no PFL metering of the inputs

– no gain controls on the user interface

The Mixing Console Of The Future

Reality mixing audio media on 2D display can be a frustrating job. With dear VR Spatial Connect Dear Realty founder Christian Sander presents a new workflow that enables an upcoming generation of VR mixing engineers to mix object based audio (binaural) or scene based audio (ambisonics) audio directly in VR without leaving the HMD. Starting with an overview of Spatial Audio objects from recording, editing, mixing, platforms and playback the session gives a good overview of upcoming workflows.

The Mixing Console Of The Future

Reality mixing audio media on 2D display can be a frustrating job. With dear VR Spatial Connect Dear Realty founder Christian Sander presents a new workflow that enables an upcoming generation of VR mixing engineers to mix object based audio (binaural) or scene based audio (ambisonics) audio directly in VR without leaving the HMD. Starting with an overview of Spatial Audio objects from recording, editing, mixing, platforms and playback the session gives a good overview of upcoming workflows.

Top 5 DAW controller

If you want to grow a DAW controller, he wants to be well considered purchase. Because you usually only buy ONE controller and not one after the other – such as microphones, which somewhow almost seem to multiply by themselves.

AVID ARTISTMIX – a widely used classic

With eight touch-sensitive motor faders and enight encodders, you have direct access to almost all parameteres within the Mix interface via internet connection. Tht eOLED display gives feedback about the respective status. Although the ArtistMix also supports protocols such as “HUI” or “Mackie Control”, it is really fun with the “EuCon” protocol – such as in Avid Pro Tools or Steinberg Nuendo.

 

 

PRESONUS FADERPORT 8 – the controller for StudioOne

In addition to eight touch-sensitive motor faders, Faderport offers a very extensive transport section. Similar to the ArtistMix, the controller also handles the protocols “HUI” and “Mackie Controll”, but the full power only unfolds with the native StudioOne support called “Universal Control”.

 

ABLENTON PUSH 2 – the llive controller

64 backlit pads and eight encoders provide a very intuitive way of working in Ableton Live. For example, you can start or stop clips and scenese, and program drum patterns. The “Scales” mode creates a completely new feel as the controller distributes only notes in a preset key on the pads.

 

NOVATION LAUNCHPAD PRO – low-cost third party

A much cheaper alternative is the Launchpad Pro, which also brings good functionality to Ableton Live with the appropriate script. 64 pads with RBG illumination allow operation in session or note mode. In the device mode, a remote control of Device is possible, although this may  be a bit more complicated due to lack of displays and encoders.

 

SOFTUBE CONSOLE 1 MK2 – the mixing tool

Conceptuall, the “console 1” from Softube today almost takes a monopoly position, because this is a perfectly matched hardware-software solution.

The USB conroller is equipped with physical controls that always take on a special function, such as the setting of high-pass filter, compressor threshold, transient designer or an equalizer. Which channel strip you with it, you can decide by plug-in. Softube and now also UAD have various models on offer.

 

Top 5 DAW controller

If you want to grow a DAW controller, he wants to be well considered purchase. Because you usually only buy ONE controller and not one after the other – such as microphones, which somewhow almost seem to multiply by themselves.

AVID ARTISTMIX – a widely used classic

With eight touch-sensitive motor faders and enight encodders, you have direct access to almost all parameteres within the Mix interface via internet connection. Tht eOLED display gives feedback about the respective status. Although the ArtistMix also supports protocols such as “HUI” or “Mackie Control”, it is really fun with the “EuCon” protocol – such as in Avid Pro Tools or Steinberg Nuendo.

 

 

PRESONUS FADERPORT 8 – the controller for StudioOne

In addition to eight touch-sensitive motor faders, Faderport offers a very extensive transport section. Similar to the ArtistMix, the controller also handles the protocols “HUI” and “Mackie Controll”, but the full power only unfolds with the native StudioOne support called “Universal Control”.

 

ABLENTON PUSH 2 – the llive controller

64 backlit pads and eight encoders provide a very intuitive way of working in Ableton Live. For example, you can start or stop clips and scenese, and program drum patterns. The “Scales” mode creates a completely new feel as the controller distributes only notes in a preset key on the pads.

 

NOVATION LAUNCHPAD PRO – low-cost third party

A much cheaper alternative is the Launchpad Pro, which also brings good functionality to Ableton Live with the appropriate script. 64 pads with RBG illumination allow operation in session or note mode. In the device mode, a remote control of Device is possible, although this may  be a bit more complicated due to lack of displays and encoders.

 

SOFTUBE CONSOLE 1 MK2 – the mixing tool

Conceptuall, the “console 1” from Softube today almost takes a monopoly position, because this is a perfectly matched hardware-software solution.

The USB conroller is equipped with physical controls that always take on a special function, such as the setting of high-pass filter, compressor threshold, transient designer or an equalizer. Which channel strip you with it, you can decide by plug-in. Softube and now also UAD have various models on offer.